Malpractice & Abuse In Psychiatry (Reply: Early Onset Bipolar Medical Briefing)

cute pink hair blod
Arguably, among the biggest names in Bi-Polar Disorder (BiPD) research came together this year, for the 2014 “8th Annual Ryan Licht Sang Bipolar Foundation” medical briefing to discuss early-onset BiPD. (1)
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They toted great success and, though admit much (*much) remains unknown, and that the tests for BiPD are clinical observation only “not a blood test” (1). None the less; the data somehow suggest diagnosis (?) and pretreatment before clinical observation is possible. Miraculous!
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They further go on to express how the children they have recruited for their pretreatment study have all been uncharacteristically treatment compliant for BiPD – and it is expected either these kids will not develop BiPD or, if they do, that the pretreatment will have mitigated the disorder.
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That is, either the treatment works, or else you just do not understand how bad it would have been – thank and pay them all the same.
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The sideshow continues as we are regaled by a tale, expertly delivered, by the crying mother of a conspicuously absent child who, we are assured, had been horribly afflicted by BiPD, but was now living the fulfilling life style of a sales representative of some variety – employee of the month, or some such thing. All as irrelevant, as it was touching; if not more so.
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And all thanks to this wonderful intervention program, despite him not being a candidate for it. Or taking part in it. That is one explanation.
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However, a contrary explanation to elucidate most, if not all, of their study results is ready at hand. Try and follow me here: might it just be that the treatment group do not have BiPD at all, and were never going to develop it? That would explain a lot. But these are professionals, and what are the odds of that?
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Well, I can tell you: the global lifetime prevalence for BiPD1 – 000.6% (2). That is right, serious disorder represents a fraction of a percent worldwide. The whole globe over. So, what does one say to such “research” as was presented today? How about “what a pile of irresponsible malpractice this pretreatment protocol appears to be?”. That might be a start.
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 Literature and lecture summary:
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Diagnosis
You are not sick. Even if you were, we wouldn’t really know what was going on. Or a lot of the time, again, if you even really were sick at all. And even say you had “something”, right; then sick with “what”  precisely, really we just . . .  *shrugs*. And even if we all agreed what was going on with the illness – well, we never know specifically, anymore than we do how treatments are suppose to work, but anyway – if we agreed on a name I mean – . . .
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Pre-Treatment Protocol
. . . look, lets just get started with medications and interventions, that we also don’t understand (especially early in life or long-term), but for some of their horrible, potentially fatal, side effects – we know about those – um. . . hmmm. . . right-o, so, let’s just go ahead and get amongst it, yeah?
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Rationale
(Psst, quickly now; while you still have no appreciable symptoms whatsoever, to treat a condition only diagnosable by the symptoms you are not yet showing, and may never show: and then we can run around declaring treatment success, sound good to you?)
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And why not? It sounds very good indeed. If I may address the researchers directly: Hey, you have little choice but to back your own research, no one else will.
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Can’t give the grant money back. It is pretty fool proof, as a scam. Though I, like any good Jewish lad, do hope you all end up in court. Good talk though. No patients saying it has helped them, sure. But good audio. Clear recording.
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One of the highlights for me included the mother’s emotive portrait of possible “success” that her son had achieved (*for all she knows). Success was to be measured by a bland television criteria that doesn’t call on quality of life (*this patient was also absent, which was smart); and all this “success” in an already diagnosed case with standard care nothing to do with the research: and post psychotic break. Well fantastic, tell us more you miracle workers! It is like Christ has returned on Galen’s birthday, after stealing Hippocrates’ wallet, while  riding on Chiron’s back!
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Then to fear-monger further, to children no less; children that almost certainly, by the sheer numbers, will not ever have BiPD – brilliant. To initiate pretreatment: and then act surprised they are doing fine? That treatment compliance is uncharacteristically good? Cycling not observable? Zero reported manic or hypo-manic progression? Well of course not!
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You treated asymptomatic healthy children, who you scared into an unnecessary compliance regime that will DEFINITELY impact their life path, in exchange for a PLETHORA of, fingers-crossed, promised maybes. And then you seem to call that some kind of success? You don’t mean “medical success”, surely? Do you?!
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Nice work. . . doctors?
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Though, to be fair; I think you’ll have to agree that treating the healthy has always been that little bit easier than healing the sick.
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I know research is hard. And the bad cases of BiPD are really bad – I know that too. But this is some, if not evil, at the very least particularly bad science.
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Though you all spoke very clearly, I’ll give you that. The performances were good. Great even! Two words: “Broad” and “Way”.
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But when you don’t know what you are treating. . . or what the drugs do across the life span (well, we both know some of the bad things, but you know what I mean). . .
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And when the interventions do happen to “work”, with a patient who actually displays pathological maladies that ask for treatment intervention: it is still idiosyncratically “patchy”, with no agreed criteria for efficacy as to what “working” actually constitutes, even then. . .
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AND we still don’t know why they even “work” in such a case, no matter which one (*each with a different mechanism) is used: it just begs asking. Treat the ill, absolutely; but is the case you present really cause to rush in and treat healthy youth?
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What possible motivation?
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We may never know. (3 , 5 , 6)
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Glaxo Smith Kline (GSK) is a maker of many BiPD treatment medications, as well as being a large funder of precisely this kind of medical research. I’m not saying that kind of thing could be related, that is just trivia. A lot of big companies do.
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Interestingly, the resulting comparison trials see the drug made by the investor company out perform its competitors 9/10 time (3). For example, if GSK put up the cash, their drug works best, but if Phizer put up more cash: suddenly their drug starts working! Pharmacology sure is complex. But that is not why I mentioned GSK.
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See, GSK also recently settled out of court for, yet another, sum of somewhere around ~$490 million; this time in China (4) . Only this case is a little bit different. Because it is only this time, I believe, that has seen two people involved in the scandal, not only drop a large pile of cash, but also end up seeing the inside of a jail cell (4, 5).
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Again, it is probably not related.
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However, should I turn out to be wrong, and this study does indeed reveal itself, in time, to be a similar situation to the one described above; there may be some skin in the game for all players. Because, money aside, when the long arm of the law reaches into the doctor’s clinic this time, it will be backed with a precedent of tough justice.
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And international or not: I suspect a precedent like that would not be conducive for sound sleeping, were I involved in such research abuses. But you do not have to worry about it for one instant longer – because I’m not.
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Distinguished dais – thank you for your presentation.
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*JJR is the psychiatry and research science investigator for the Chronicle LS.
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[+++] Research Blog Marker
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JJR (2014). Reply: Early Onset Bipolar Medical Briefing. JChron.LettSci, OCT (20), Ed7.
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1- Early Onset Bipolar Medical Briefing (BiPDFndn AUG2014) http://tinyurl.com/levxuus
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2 – Merikangas, R., et al (2012) Prevalence and Correlates of Bipolar Spectrum Disorder in the World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. Mar 2011; 68(3): 241–251. doi:  10.1001/archgenpsychiatry
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3 – Atypical Suicide: Psychiatric Research Abuse at the University of Minnesota (Elliott 2014)http://tinyurl.com/k8j5ww6
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4 – China fines GSK $492 million in Xanax & Valium No Longer To Be Sold In Australia (2014)- http://tinyurl.com/melw7fb
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5 – Jail Time in Doctor GSK Case (AP 2014) – http://tinyurl.com/qg5g8lu
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6- Pfizer Inc : Corporate Crimes – http://tinyurl.com/oja9u7n
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About J.Chron.Ltt.&Sci. [JRR]

~CogSc (Humour); NeuroPsych; Philosophy (Death/Identity); Methods (Research); Intelligence/Investigation (Forensic); Medical Error~
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